Visitors were welcomed back to the Australian War Memorial this week, after a three-month closure caused by COVID-19 restrictions.

The Australian War Memorial welcomed backed visitors this week, for the first time since pandemic restrictions forced its closure on 23 March.

Leading up to the 1 July opening, visitors were asked to book free, timed tickets to the venue in order to adhere with social distancing restrictions.

An Australian War Memorial spokesperson said the new format, designed to safeguard staff and visitors, ran smoothly upon opening.

“The revised visitor format, including timed sessions which are designed to prioritise staff and public safety, was successfully implemented and ran smoothly throughout the day,” they said.  

“On the first day of reopening, virtually all ticketed sessions were booked. Demand for tickets continues to be high, and we encourage visitors to book tickets early to avoid missing out.

“The number of free, timed-entry tickets made available to the public will continue to be reviewed in line with government advice.”

Visitors are invited to book sessions to visit the Anzac Hall or museum galleries, or to attend the Last Post Ceremony.

Memorial director, Matt Anderson, said he was pleased to welcome visitors back to the venue.

“Tickets have almost been exhausted for our first day, so we encourage people to book their free tickets online before they visit to avoid missing out,” he said.

“The Last Post Ceremony at the Australian War Memorial is a truly memorable experience, and we are pleased that people will be able to experience it in person again.”

Like many of the Territory’s other cultural institutions, the venue remained active behind the scenes despite its closure.

“The Anzac Day 2020 commemorative service, broadcast live by the ABC, was watched by Australians in their living rooms and driveways across the country,” Mr Anderson said.

“Our online Museum At Home has also brought together digital interactive experiences, award-winning podcast series and online exhibitions and programs for schools, students and the general public. We will continue to build on these resources to ensure the Memorial remains accessible to as many people as possible.”

Visitors are welcomed to book timed sessions online, or at the Memorial entry subject to capacity.

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