The University of Canberra has held its title as the fastest rising university across the globe, ranking at number 18 on Times Higher Education Young University Rankings. Image supplied.

The University of Canberra (UC) has jumped to number 18 in the top young university rankings today, maintaining its reputation as the fastest rising university across the globe.

The University jumped 16 places on the Times Higher Education Young University Rankings since last year’s report, putting it in the top 3% of young universities nationally.

University of Canberra Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Paddy Nixon said the University was pleased to see the jump.

“I think it’s as simple as we focus on the things we do well. For the University, it is a recognition of the hard work the staff put in, but ultimately the value of a degree that UC students come out with,” he said. 

“We have always had exceptional commitment to the teaching we do, and we have focused on our research capacity and I think we are seeing the rewards of that.”

The University has research centres and institutes on campus across communication, education, environment, governance and health.

Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research and Innovation Professor Leigh Sullivan said the standard of research at the University was world-class.

“We are proud that UC research focuses on innovative and impactful outcomes,” he said.
“We aim to make a difference to the world around us and I think that is evident in every single research project underway at the University.”
UC also ranked within the top 200 of the World University Rankings, sitting at number 193 in the world, and number 10 in Australia. The University boasts a 90% employment rate and a higher starting salary from its graduates than the Australian university average.
Mr Nixon said he hoped to see the University to maintain its ranking, if not exceed it in years to come.
“At this point everybody is trying to improve, I hope we would maintain our position but the current challenges with COVID-19 are resources and I don’t know how that will impact us in the medium-term – the quality of our teaching and courses won’t change,” he said.

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