Talking temperature through windows

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Most of your home’s energy is lost through windows, with research suggesting up to 40% of temperature lost and 87% of heat gained in your home occurs through uncovered windows.

Outdoor awnings can help reflect heat and UV rays to drastically reduce a room’s heat gain and protect furniture from sun damage and fading. Pictured: Evo MagnaTrack Awning, Luxaflex.

When it comes to keeping the heat at bay or keeping heat locked in, window furnishings, blinds and shutters can offer a sustainable solution and enhance the performance of existing windows.

“During the day, your windows let in more radiant energy than gets out. Sunlight enters through the glass, but as the window is unable to let infrared radiation escape, your home will get warmer and warmer,” says Vera Meharg, Marketing Communications Manager, Luxaflex Window Fashions.

“Stopping the heat of the sun from entering your home in the first place is much better than letting it in and cooling it down afterwards.”

Actions as simple as closing window coverings first thing in the morning will prevent the heat of the day from entering, and help retain the coolest temperatures from overnight. Quality sunscreen fabrics will reflect heat and UV rays, drastically helping to reduce a room’s heat gain as well as protect furniture from sun damage or fading. Window coverings with insulating properties also provide extra heat defence.

Outdoor shade can help maintain your home’s internal temperature. Outdoor awnings can help reflect heat and UV rays to drastically reduce a room’s heat gain, as well as help protect furniture from sun damage and fading.

Online resource: Looking for info to help create a sustainable home? YourHome [www.yourhome.gov.au] provides a comprehensive guide to the design principles and features that add value to your home and reduce its environmental impact. Described as ‘Australia’s guide to environmentally sustainable homes’ the website covers include passive design, materials, energy, water and more.

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