22.4 C
Canberra
Thursday, January 21, 2021
Ian Cubitts
Ian Cubitts

Review your Survival Plan when travelling, ACTESA tells Canberrans

The Christmas holidays begin next week, and the ACT Emergency Services Agency (ACTESA) urges all Canberrans travelling outside the Territory to review their Survival Plan for their destination.

“If Black Summer has taught us anything, it’s that an emergency can happen anywhere, and you always need to be prepared,”  ACTESA Commissioner Georgeina Whelan said.

With restrictions easing, many people will travel interstate and visit bushfire prone areas outside the ACT.

Although you may not live in an at-risk area, Ms Whelan said it was important to understand risks at your holiday destination.

“Canberrans travelling into NSW or Queensland should check relevant emergency service websites to see if their holiday destination is a high-risk bushfire area, and stay up-to-date with daily fire danger or emergencies in the area,” Commissioner Whelan said.

“Travellers should review their Survival Plan for the area they will be staying in. You should know what you will do if threatened by an emergency, such as a bushfire. How will you leave the area quickly? Are you travelling with important supplies such as water in the car? Do you know where to receive emergency information?”

ACT Rural Fire Service (ACTRFS) Acting Chief Officer Rohan Scott encouraged the community to enjoy this holiday period safely by thinking about potential risks.

“While a lot of bushland was burnt during the Black Summer, there is still a risk of fires, particularly grass fires this season,” Mr Scott said.

“When camping, driving, or planning to light a cooking fire, be extra careful, as a small fire can quickly escalate into a major incident in hot and windy conditions.”

NSW Rural Fire Service Commissioner Rob Rogers said travellers should check weather conditions before they travel.

The recent rain had made grass grow; as it dried out, there was more risk of grass fires.

“So, if you are travelling, check the local conditions, know the fire danger rating, and know what you will do if a fire starts,” Mr Rogers said.

For more news:

Ian Cubitts
Ian Cubitts