20.6 C
Canberra
Sunday, November 29, 2020
Glavcorp
Glavcorp

MoAD to reopen next week

MoAD today announced the national institution will reopen their lower galleries to the public from 15 June, as large-scale renovation works continue to be undertaken on the heritage building.

While some of Canberra’s institutions have been able to open sooner, the museum’s renovation works undertaken during the pandemic shutdown pushed their reopening back.

Museum Director Daryl Karp said due to the works they wouldn’t have access to the front of the building until 15 June.

One aspect of the project is vital conservation works throughout the heritage building.

“During MoAD’s closure, we have taken the opportunity to bring forward the completion of an ambitious capital works project,” Karp said.

“As custodians of Old Parliament House, we want to ensure the beautiful heritage spaces are available to visitors for generations to come.”

Sessions for their permanent exhibitions in the lower gallery; Behind the Lines and Truth, Power and a Free Press will be available when MoAD reopens.

It will still however be a little while before the public can access the main floor while renovations continue.

The most notable is the essential work being carried out in the Senate Chamber to stabilise the wall render, conserve fabric panels and refresh paint.

This work is being done by a team of expert conservation architects, painters, plasterers and conservators who are working from John Smith Murdoch’s original plans.

Extensive renovation work has also taken place in preparation for a major exhibition due to open in 2021.

The exhibition will focus on the rich fabric of Australia’s unique democracy, highlighting the key moments and decision points that shaped Australia.

An exhibition flagged for opening in August 2020 is an extension of the Enlighten experience, Hive Mind and explores visitors’ experiences of democracy.

A second exhibition slated to open before the end of the year will tell the story of the National Party of Australia through a collection of objects and interpretive material in the historic Country Party Room and adjoining spaces.

For more stories: