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Monday, November 30, 2020

Create a tea nook at home

How do you like your cuppa?

The answer is different across world cultures.

In Chinese tradition, formal tea ceremonies are used to show respect to older generations, apologise for wrongdoing, show gratitude or to celebrate weddings and rituals.

In British culture and society, it’s common to sip tea while eating sandwiches, crumpets, scones, cake and biscuits. Some believe the tradition was started by a friend of Queen Victoria.

But British tea traditions are not entirely historical with trendy tea houses continuing to pop up around modern London.

Known as the “way of tea”, Japanese tea ceremonies embody the principles of Zen Buddhism.

Traditionally tranquil, one of the main purposes of the Japanese tea ceremony is for guests to enjoy the hospitality of the host in an atmosphere distinct from the fast pace of everyday life.

Whichever way you take your tea, try these tips to find your perfect cup.

Create a comfortable tea nook

Dedicate an area for your quiet moment of tea drinking. Just a corner or nook will do, preferably somewhere with natural light. 

Deck it out with a bean bag or accent chair, wall art, music (to drown everything else out) and depending on your desired level of Zen, candles, water features and lava lamps are good options.

The décor of your new cosy nook should match your house and personal style, but some suitable styles include minimal Scandi with calming timber, fresh, understated, modern chic or the classic floral.

Having the perfect place to sit and drink a cup of tea is in line with the Danish concept of hyggecosy contentment comes from comfort and quality time spent with loved ones.

Build your own tea bar

Because kitchens can get cluttered, a woven basket or bowl to hold your tea varieties creates a health-conscious haven and a visual reminder to drink up.

Depending on the type, the health benefits of tea can include improved digestion, stress-relieving properties, and energy boosts.

You will need a beautiful tea set. If teatime is just for you, T2 has sets for one. If you’re tea timing with your kids, Kmart has a ceramic set with a DIY painting kit full of cuteness.

But if you get a full set you can …

Host your own tea party

How long has it been since you’ve had a tea party? Because the game has changed. 

Many adults are looking for more social outlets without an alcoholic focus which makes tea parties perfect.

As restrictions lift, we get can together with friends for tea and plates of sandwiches and cakes – whilst social distancing.  But for distant relatives or those with vulnerable health classifications, virtual tea parties are definitely a thing.

Host a charity fundraiser

There are some great charities out there to raise funds for.

Project Didi Australia, Something for Slavery and the Cancer Council’s World’s Biggest Morning Tea are just a few worthy causes that run tea party fundraisers to help you put some meaning in your fun.

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