ACT Government public spaces now off limits

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Public spaces like this outdoor fitness station are now closed in the ACT
Outdoor fitness stations in the ACT, such as this one at Henry Rolland Park photographed last week, are among public spaces deemed off limits from midday today, Monday 30 March. Photo: Kerrie Brewer.

Playgrounds, skate parks, outdoor fitness stations and outdoor barbecues across the Territory are just some of the public spaces to close from midday today, Monday 30 March, following Sunday’s (29 March) National Cabinet meeting.

Additional ACT Government public spaces to be closed until further notice are: the Tidbinbilla Visitor Information Centre; the Namadgi Visitor Information Centre; all campgrounds including Cotter Campground, Blue Range Campground, Northern Border Campground, Kowen Campground and all campsites in Namadgi National Park, with all current bookings to be refunded; and cottages within ACT parks and reserves.

The ACT Government said while these public spaces may not be fenced off or gated, please do not use them. Signage will be erected in coming days.

Despite the closure of the Visitor Information Centre, Tidbinbilla Nature Reserve will remain open to the public but visitors will need to adhere to the new public gathering rules of no more than two people.

All other parks and reserves across the ACT will remain open with the new public gathering rules in place. Namadgi National Park remains closed due to safety reasons following the Orroral Valley bushfire.

In addition to the closure of ACT Government public spaces, ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr said the ACT will implement tougher restrictions to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the ACT.

In a statement on Sunday 29 March, Mr Barr said to help slow the spread, “we are requiring Canberrans to only leave their homes for the following reasons: shopping for what you need – food and necessary supplies; medical or health care needs, including compassionate requirements; exercise in compliance with the public gathering requirements; and work and study if you can’t work or learn remotely.

Mr Barr also encouraged Canberrans aged 70 and over to stay at home, as much as possible, to reduce infection risk.

“It is the best advice we can provide to avoid the more serious consequences from the virus. However, this does not mean that over 70s cannot leave their homes. They should exercise caution though, and avoid crowds, and maintain physical distancing wherever possible,” he said.

“Over time, we understand that this will require a greater coordination of community support networks. The ACT Government, and our community sector partners, will be developing additional ways that we can support elderly Canberrans.” 

For official advice on coronavirus COVID-19 in Canberra, visit ACT Health.